Motorcycle tuning – is it possible?

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Most likely you know riding very well and have at least 1000 km on the road if you have decided to tune your motorcycle. If not, then you are still an amateur in this field and it is recommended that you get more experience.

This is just one of the tuning options. Apart from that, it is advisable to change various components like tires, and in doing so, it is advisable to check motorcycle tire brands.

Basics

Every motorcycle has an engine and a carburetor. Let’s assume that it is in perfect condition. This means that there is no oil leakage etc. etc. Unless you are an amateur, you probably know where your engine is and where your carburetor is and have a screwdriver with you. Your machine must have done at least ~500 km or more. Also, make sure you don’t change the fuel type while tuning.

Start

Warm up your engine. Go for a ride around town. Calmly accelerate to at least half of the motorcycle’s maximum speed. Drive for at least 10 to 15 minutes to allow the engine system to warm up properly. Don’t leave the engine idling and start upgrading.

What to do next

Now that the engine is properly warmed up, you can start the process. You can choose a place away from the city or a residential area so as not to disturb the tired, sick, disgusted, elderly people or babies (children) living in your area. Put your motorcycle on the main stand and grab a screwdriver. That’s all you need. Of course, add to that a dose of knowledge and sensible action.

Fuel/air screws

The aforementioned screws are responsible for adjusting the ratio of air to fuel, which creates, in short, food for the engine. This can be related to our human body where proteins, carbohydrates, fats, water, etc. are needed in the right proportions to each other for a good, strong body.


There is another screw that sets the idle speed of the machine. This screw is not related to intake or mileage. It simply sets the “idle” speed of the engine. Two-stroke machines have an air screw and four-stroke machines have a fuel screw. The air screw is located on the carburetor away from the engine. [Engine – carburetor – air screw]

The fuel screw is on the carburetor, but it is close to the engine [engine – fuel screw – carburetor]. If the brand of your carburetor is Mikuni (Pulsar, Yamaha, Fiero), the fuel-air screw will probably be brass (gold color). If you completely unscrew this screw and take it in hand, you will see a needle shaped tip.

The idle screw is tightly connected to the throttle cable. The idle screw can be turned by hand. A screwdriver is not necessary for this. Finding these screws is very easy. If you still can’t find the air/fuel screw, ask your mechanic for help.

What now In addition to the above difference we gave between the air screw and the fuel screw, there is another major difference. A screwed-in fuel screw (clockwise) gives a poor mixture, and a screwed-out fuel screw (counterclockwise) gives a rich mixture. A screwed-in air screw gives a rich mixture, and a screwed-out air screw (counterclockwise) gives a lean mixture

Putting things in motion

Turn the idle adjustment screw so that the revs reach about 3000 rpm. Now adjust the fuel-air screw so that the mixture is as low as possible. Check whether you need to turn the screw clockwise or counterclockwise.

As the mixture becomes poorer, slowly reduce the engine speed. Continue until you have adjusted the fuel screw to the poorest possible position. At the same time, make sure the engine does not stall by turning the idle screw.

You will immediately notice a change in engine sound and throttle response. Your engine may become smoother or rougher. Another important consideration is ride and feel. Always ride and feel the motorcycle in each gear, check the response and sound of the engine

(Photo: pixabay.com)

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